Mississippi recently hosted its largest pro-life walk yet. 

Three-hundred and fifty eight registered walkers and 52 partner churches raised over $70,000 for The Center for Pregnancy Choices Metro Area at their first annual LifeWalk. This exceeded their goal by over $20,000. 

Due to generous local business partners underwriting the event, 100 percent of LifeWalk proceeds will go to serving the women of Hinds, Rankin, and Madison counties facing unplanned pregnancies. 

The CPC Metro Area offers free and confidential medical-quality pregnancy tests, high-quality sonograms, options counseling, literature, parenting classes, referrals to community services, infant supplies, and prenatal vitamins. They are funded solely from the generosity of local Mississippians, their businesses, and their churches. 

The two clinics in North Jackson and Fondren are staffed with registered nurses and trained decision specialists. Their medical capabilities are made possible by their medical director, two volunteer radiologists, and a pharmacy that provides prenatal vitamins. 

Truly, the Jackson area community makes their mission possible. 

Each of the 52 participating churches had a Walk Ambassador who assembled their own walk teams. Each walker raised their own sponsorship in their respective spheres of influence and set personal goals accordingly. Highland Colony Baptist Church stands out as a church that went above and beyond, raising the most funds of any participating church. Nine families raised $1,000 or more for the clinics, while 22 others raised $500 plus by their own accord. First Baptist Church in Raymond formed the largest team, with 32 walkers. A young woman from Clinton raised over $2,700 as an individual. Funds poured in from Madison, Ridgeland, Jackson, Flowood, Brandon, Pearl, Terry, Florence, Raymond, Clinton, Star, and Pelahatchie.

It is abundantly clear—Mississippi is a pro-life state. We are ready to put our money where our mouth is. We are literally walking the walk we talk. Following Gov. Phil Bryant signing our Heatbeat Bill this session, recently halted by a court order, we see that Mississippians will not wait for courts to catch up with our progress. 

Neither the state nor federal government fill the gap for the women of Mississippi quite like The CPC Metro Area does. 

Voluntary associations and local philanthropy show us that private institutions and individuals support women in crisis.