Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves was elected governor, besting Attorney General Jim Hood by a 53-45 margin. Republicans will retain an office they have held since 2003 and for all but four years dating back to 1991. 

Reeves took an early lead, and was in command the whole night. Hood was able to make some progress over past Democratic candidates, particularly in his home base in Northeast Mississippi. Hood also did better than most Democrats in the suburbs, winning 35 percent in Rankin county and holding Reeves to a virtual tie in Madison county. 

But in the end, it wasn’t enough to propel a Democrat into the governor’s mansion. 

The governor’s race was the only competitive statewide race on the ballot. Republicans were expected to easily carry the remaining seven offices – and they did just that. This marks the first time since Reconstruction that Republicans occupy each of the eight statewide offices. 

Lt. Governor

Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann, a Republican, defeated Democrat State. Rep. Jay Hughes 61-39, with 75 percent reporting. 

Attorney General

Republicans finally captured the office that had escaped them since Republican dominance in statewide election came to fruition in 2007. Treasurer Lynn Fitch defeated Democrat Jennifer Riley-Collins 59-41, with 75 percent reporting. 

Auditor

Shad White, who was appointed auditor by Gov. Phil Bryant a year ago, was unopposed in his first run for the office. 

Secretary of State

Republican State Sen. Michael Watson defeated former Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree, a Democrat, 60-40, with 75 percent reporting. 

Treasurer

Republican David McCrae defeated Democrat Addie Lee Green 62-38, with 75 percent reporting. 

Agriculture Commissioner

Republican Andy Gipson, who was appointed to this position by Bryant last year, was elected to his first full term. He defeated Democrat Rickey Cole 60-40, with 75 percent reporting.

Insurance Commissioner

Mike Chaney is the only incumbent who was elected four years ago to win election for the same position today. Chaney defeated his Democrat opponent Robert Amos, 62-37, with 75 percent reporting.